Sarah S ABER

17 Jan 1846 - ____

Father: Jonas W ABER
Mother: Jane STEWART

Family 1 : Frank BREWSTER
  1.  Fred BREWSTER
  2.  Monroe BREWSTER

                 _Nathaniel ABER _+
 _Jonas W ABER _|
|               |_Anna WASS ______+
|
|--Sarah S ABER 
|
|                _James STEWART __
|_Jane STEWART _|
                |_ JANE __________

INDEX

[122273] [S1084] Stephen Louis Schifani

[122274] [S1084] Stephen Louis Schifani

[122275] [S1084] Stephen Louis Schifani

[150868] [S1084] Stephen Louis Schifani


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William Worth HARPER Sr.

[14920]

1819 - 17 Jan 1894

Father: John HARPER Sr.

Family 1 : Mary Jane COON
  1.  Martha E. HARPER
  2.  James J. HARPER
  3.  Elizabeth B. HARPER
  4.  Emma HARPER
  5.  Louise HARPER
  6. +William Worth HARPER Jr.
  7.  Bin HARPER
  8.  S. Byron HARPER
  9.  Henry HARPER
  10.  Stephen HARPER
  11.  Marcus HARPER

                   __
 _John HARPER Sr._|
|                 |__
|
|--William Worth HARPER Sr.
|
|                  __
|_________________|
                  |__

INDEX

[14920] William W. Harper Sr. was born in 1819 at (Varrick), Senecca County, New York. His residents were: 1843: Varrick, Seneca County, New York. 1864: Waterloo, Seneca County, New York. He moved his family from Seneca County, to Michigan on November 13, 1871. William later setted at Mason (Vevay Township), Ingham County, Michigan. His family later moved in with local neighbors because of financial hardship due to disability.

[14921]

[139456] Married by C.C. Carpenter of Romulus Tws., Seneca Co., N.y.

[14916] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[14917] [S93] Rathbun.FTW2.FTW

[14918] [S94] Rathbun.Warboys.FTW

[14919] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[14922] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[14923] [S93] Rathbun.FTW2.FTW

[14924] [S94] Rathbun.Warboys.FTW

[14925] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[14926] [S93] Rathbun.FTW2.FTW

[14927] [S94] Rathbun.Warboys.FTW

[14928] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[14929] [S93] Rathbun.FTW2.FTW

[14930] [S94] Rathbun.Warboys.FTW

[14931] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[14932] [S94] Rathbun.Warboys.FTW

[14933] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[14934] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[14935] [S93] Rathbun.FTW2.FTW

[14936] [S94] Rathbun.Warboys.FTW

[14937] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[14938] [S93] Rathbun.FTW2.FTW

[14939] [S94] Rathbun.Warboys.FTW

[14940] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[14941] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[14942] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[14943] [S94] Rathbun.Warboys.FTW

[139454] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[139455] [S93] Rathbun.FTW2.FTW

[139457] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[139458] [S93] Rathbun.FTW2.FTW


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George Judson HURLBUT

1843 - 1912

Father: Harris E HURLBUT

Family 1 :
  1. +Myron Alva HURLBUT

                     _Ebenezer HURLBUT _+
 _Harris E HURLBUT _|
|                   |_Fannie BREWSTER __
|
|--George Judson HURLBUT 
|
|                    ___________________
|___________________|
                    |___________________

INDEX

[137834] [S1137] via Gil Hurlbut

[137835] [S1137] via Gil Hurlbut

[137836] [S1137] via Gil Hurlbut


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Thomas Edward KELLEHER

[99890] [99892]

1 May 1947 - ____

Father: Francis Robert KELLEHER
Mother: Helen Ethel CRYST

Family 1 : Carolyn Virginia BERNEKING
  1.  Amy Virginia KELLEHER
  2.  Andrew Thomas KELLEHER
  3.  Anna Bailey KELLEHER

                            ________________________
 _Francis Robert KELLEHER _|
|                          |________________________
|
|--Thomas Edward KELLEHER 
|
|                           _George Michael CRYSXT _
|_Helen Ethel CRYST _______|
                           |_Amelia HURLBURT _______+

INDEX

[99890] Tom was born in Clifton Springs, New York. The hospital was chosen as Tom's Aunt ( Olive Hilda McDonough a.k.a. Aunt Olive) because she had delivered her daughter Sue Kelleher there, and recommended it to Helen Kelleher. It has been noted that on May 1, 1947 it snowed - and it must have been some accumulation in the Clifton Springs area of West Central New York, as Helen Kelleher often told of the snow in conjunction with the birth of Tom.
The development years for Thomas ( in Geneva he was known as Tommy ) were the 1950's.
Tom attended various schools as his mother was a teacher in the Geneva School System, and she moved Tommy to various schools. For example: Kindergarten - Tommy attended North Street School; 1st Grade - 1/2 of 5th Grade Tommy was at St. Francis De Sales Elementary School. At St. Francis, Tommy's mother Helen was his 3rd Grade Teacher, until about April when her health (Cancer of the Uterus) caused her to take a leave of absence and she did not finish the year. A substitute teacher Mrs. Maslyn came and finished the year. Tommy was generally an A+ student, but he began to have more difficulties reading and this may have been a result of his mothers illness and distractions at home. In any event, in the 4th Grade Tommy was still in the top 10% of the class, but he worked harder. In the 5th Grade his teacher was Sister Laura-Marie, a more stern teacher and one who saw Tommy's grades slip, and he was struggling for grades in the 5th Grade. Here is again where Helen removed Tommy from St. Francis School, though Helen had returned to St, Francis to teach, she was not comfortable with the environment and not at all with Sister Laura Marie. Tommy was moved back to North Street School in the middle of the year, just after Christmas Vacation. Generally Tommy was not aware of the anticipated changes and seemed to adapt socially quite well, after all, he had known both schools kids before, so change was not so bad. Tommy seemed to bounce back quite well with Mrs. Hemple the 5th Grade Teacher at North Street School. In 6th grade Tommy was in Miss Wilson's class, an older teacher who unlike Mrs. Hemple did not know Tommy's parents and she was an old mad, who lived with her mother in North Main Street. She was an avid Bird Watcher and one who was more strict. Tommy was a B to B- Student there. In the 7th grade Tommy was moved again - this time to the Junior High School. His home room teacher for the 3 yrs. (7th - 9th) was Mr. Sours. Sours was a former Minister who had for some reason left that profession at or near retirement. He and Tommy were not 'close' Tommy was always a fast witted kid, who challenged most teachers for the classes attention. Tommy was a A to B- Student in Junior High. One high point for Tommy in Junior High was that he came in 2nd in the New York State Science Fair. Tommy built a 7 inch reflector telescope. On the day of the competition at Brockport NY Tommy was taking an entrance exam for Prep School, and had a class mate and his father take the telescope for him to the state fair. They inadvertently left the eye piece home, and this may have effected the judges scoring. Tommy was still quite a hit tom the small Geneva Community, with newspaper coverage and special recognition at school.
In the 10th grade, Tommy or Tom then, was sent to St. Francis Prep School, in Spring Grove Pennsylvania. Tom was a B to C- student, and had difficulty with Algebra, but not Geometry which he did quite well in. Because he had struggled with Algebra, he was not eligible for passes to town on Saturday with the other boys. This was an expensive private Perpetrator school, which Tom's Mother found through a contact at church. Tom went only one year to the Prep School, and then returned to De Sales High School where he was a junior. Tom went out for the football team which he had done in 9th, and 10th grade. Tom was not at all a gifted athlete, but rather a kid with 'stick-to-it' stuff. He was a true bench warmer, but never missed a practice, and even though in 9th grade his JV uniform was not even the same color as the others, he invited his boy-hood hero, Harry F. Moran ( a neighbor on Maple Street, and fellow employee of Tom's Dad).
The real disappointment for tom came at time of graduation. Tom was not allowed to graduate with the class, but rather he had to rewrite his senior English paper as he wrote it on Tobacco Road and that book was not allowed in the Catholic Schools in the mid-60's. Tom did and graduated and attended Paul Smith's College in the Adirondack Mountains, in the fall of 1965.
The former Geneva Times had an article about the 50's which is included as it highlights many local facts. They were the Fabulous Fifties. ( as it appeared July 25th in the Finger Lakes Times) A time of prosperity, the baby boom and innovative technology that helped shape the future of the world. The population of the United States - just 48 at that time - was 151.3 million. The average annual income was $2,992; a dozen eggs cost 72 cents, a quart of milk, 21 cents; and a pound of butter, 60 cents. A 1958 Dodge, equipped with a push-button automatic transmission, could be bought new for $2,500; and a Cadillac El Dorado Brougham rang in at $13,074. A little-known singer from Tupelo, Miss., hit the music world with a bang in 1955 and a hit called 'Heartbreak Hotel.’’His name was Elvis Presley and his sound would change the music industry. As the decade came to an end, on Feb. 3, 1959, Buddy Holly, The Big Bopper (J. P. Richardson) and Ritchie Valens were killed in an airplane crash; singer Don McLean later immortalized that as 'the day the music died.’’ Drive-in movies and diners became popular; air raid sirens and drills were commonplace. Headlines of the ‘50s blared that North Korean troops had invaded South Korea; Princess Elizabeth became Queen Elizabeth II of England at the age of 25; Josef Stalin died and Nikita Khruschchev later rose to power in the Soviet Union; Fidel Castro lead a revolution in Cuba; McCarthysim lead to the Red Scare here at home; and Dwight D. Eisenhower was twice elected president, with Richard Nixon his vice president. The economic boom trickled down locally, in some cases, only temporarily. Harold Secor, 80, of Savannah, was born and raised in that small town and has owned Secor Lumber since the 1950s. 'It’s a different town now,' Secor said. 'It used to be a farming community, and now it’s a bedroom community.' He said Savannah is 'just your average small town' and hasn’t changed much over the years, except for a decline in businesses. 'Life is what you make it in these places,' he added. Before I was married, we would usually go to Lyons because there were a couple of beer joints there, and Clyde had a hotel,' Secor said. The kids, he said, would go either to Owasco Lake, where there was an amusement park; or go swimming in Cayuga Lake. There were several stores in the downtown area in the 1950s, including an International Harvester dealer, TV sales and repair, barber shops, grocery stores, a hardware and a variety store. Secor said the town had two or three packing houses, to process produce from several farmers who worked the many acres of muck land, and celery was one of their main crops. He said labor contractors hired migrant workers from the south to work in the packing houses. There were probably as many migrant workers as residents in the town in the early 1950s,' he said. Companies including Campbell’s bought farm local crops and stored produce in buildings in Savannah to await pickup by freight train. The razing of the New York Central Railroad depot in 1954 signaled the decline in railroad dependence; four years later, the cold storage buildings stopped operating. Down the road in Clyde, 82-year-old Anna Burley also fondly remembers a bustling village that was Clyde in the 1950s, where businesses boomed and her children’s friends played happily in the backyard. There were two banks, a half-dozen grocery stores, dry cleaners, barber shops, a newspaper, shoe stores, dry goods stores, several restaurants and creameries. When GE came in 1951, it was a big thing,' Burley said. Her first husband, Russell Groat, was one of the first people hired to help prepare the assembly line for workers. Other family members, including her sister, Eleanor DeLisio, secretary to the general manager, also found employment at the General Electric plant. On Saturday evenings, Burley said, many farmers would come into town to do their banking and shopping, and took in a movie at the theater on Glasgow Street. Burley said even though kids in the 1950s didn’t have what is available to kids today, they made their own fun. We always had kids at the house. They would get together and play baseball, have pajama parties and stay all night,' she said. I made a lot of pizzas and cookies back then,' she added. Her husband, Fred Burley, said Tom Gallagher, the one-man police department of the 1950s, kept the kids in line the old-fashioned way. I remember when he was having trouble with a kid in the park, he turned him over his knee and spanked him, and there was no more trouble,' Fred Burley said. Yates County Historian Fran Dumas said Yates County in the 1950s was like everywhere else. It was a period of great prosperity, particularly in the farming and manufacturing industry,' she said. But it was also a time of reaching the peak of progress, at least for some time. After that is when the rural economy generally started to slip,' she said. 'The ‘50s were the good old days. Everybody looks back at how prosperous and happy they were,' she added. One milestone of the decade that made phone calls easier was the arrival of dial telephones to replace operators in Newark, Lyons and Palmyra. The decade also heard broadcasting from the first AM radio station in Wayne County, WACK, which is still on the air; the opening of the new Newark Hospital, now called the Newark campus of Via Health of Wayne. Shopping malls were also a creation of the ‘50s, including the Newark Plaza on Route 31 and Town and Country Plaza on Hamilton Street in Geneva. The rose gardens were going great guns then, too, said Wayne County historian Deborah Ferrell. People would come from all over the world to see them, and there was a parade every year, she said. Sampson Army Depot in Seneca County also saw expansion during the decade.
In June 1950, with the outbreak of the Korean War, the depot had 803 civilian employees; peak employment of 821 was reached two years later. In 1953 and 1954, two large General Service Administration warehouses were constructed, and in 1956, the first white fawn was spotted in the resident deer herd at the depot. In the northern end of Seneca County, in 1951, a contract was awarded for $1,642,286 to W.A. Wikstrom, Inc., of Skaneateles to construct a 4.5-mile section of the state Thruway across the Montezuma Wildlife Refuge. Construction and consolidation were among the big news in Ontario County, as Manchester school was centralized during the first year of the decade to become Red Jacket Central School. The reopening of Canandaigua’s Main Street, after reconstruction, came in August 1950 during the Finger Lakes Festival, when about 40,000 people lined the streets to watch a 100-unit parade. Fred Burley said he would like to see the new millennium breathe life back into the smaller towns. I’m tired of hearing the word ‘progress’when it destroys,' he said. Secor said the fate of Savannah and other rural towns in the next thousand years may depend not on business and industry but tourism.

[99891]

[99892] Medical: Diabetic # 2 (diagnosed) 1992 Galblade removed in 1982 Hernia surgery/repair 2 times, in Jr. High School aprx 1959 and as an adult 1999

[99887] [S977] Thomas Edward Kelleher

[99888] [S977] Thomas Edward Kelleher

[99889] [S977] Thomas Edward Kelleher

[147955] [S977] Thomas Edward Kelleher


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Daniel MORSE

[89843]

ABT 1613 - 5 Jun 1688

Father: Samuel MORSE
Mother: Elizabeth JASPER

Family 1 : Lydia FISHER
  1.  Obediah MORSE
  2.  Daniel MORSE
  3.  Jonathan MORSE
  4.  Lydia MORSE
  5.  Bethia MORSE
  6. +Samuel MORSE

                     _Richard MORSE ___
 _Samuel MORSE _____|
|                   |_Margaret SYMSON _
|
|--Daniel MORSE 
|
|                    __________________
|_Elizabeth JASPER _|
                    |__________________

INDEX

[89843] J. H. Morse & Emily Leavitt,Morse Genealogy,(New York:Morse Society, 1903).
Gene A. Hill,'Ancestors and Descendants of Oliver Johnson Scofield', (Portland,ME:Privately Printed,1989.
Kingsbury, John M.,'Genetic Inbreeding in a Colonial Puritan Community', National Genealogical Society Quarterly, 84(June 1996).

[89844]

[89839] [S749] GEDCOM File James L. Collins

[89840] [S749] GEDCOM File James L. Collins

[89841] [S749] GEDCOM File James L. Collins

[89842] [S749] GEDCOM File James L. Collins

[89845] [S749] GEDCOM File James L. Collins

[146984] [S749] GEDCOM File James L. Collins


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Mary Eliza PERRY

29 Oct 1849 - 25 Dec 1913

Family 1 : Henry Martin (Rev.) SHERMAN

    __
 __|
|  |__
|
|--Mary Eliza PERRY 
|
|   __
|__|
   |__

INDEX

[113007] [S1080] GEDCOM File C:\TMGW\SHERMAN.GE

[113008] [S1080] GEDCOM File C:\TMGW\SHERMAN.GE

[113009] [S1080] GEDCOM File C:\TMGW\SHERMAN.GE

[113010] [S1080] GEDCOM File C:\TMGW\SHERMAN.GE

[149684] [S1080] GEDCOM File C:\TMGW\SHERMAN.GE


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Janelle S. SMITH

9 Sep 1955 - ____

Family 1 : Ronald J. PEDERSON
  1.  Benjamin Smith PEDERSON

    __
 __|
|  |__
|
|--Janelle S. SMITH 
|
|   __
|__|
   |__

INDEX

[55219] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[55220] [S93] Rathbun.FTW2.FTW

[55221] [S94] Rathbun.Warboys.FTW

[55222] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW

[55223] [S93] Rathbun.FTW2.FTW

[55224] [S94] Rathbun.Warboys.FTW

[142933] [S92] Rathbun.FTW2.FBC.FTW


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Sarah STRONG

ABT 1656 - 10 Feb 1733

Father: John STRONG

Family 1 : Joseph BARNARD
  1. +Thankful BARNARD
Family 2 : (Capt) Jonathan WELLS

                __
 _John STRONG _|
|              |__
|
|--Sarah STRONG 
|
|               __
|______________|
               |__

INDEX

[96564] [S806] GEDCOM File Ed Colburn

[96565] [S805] GEDCOM File C:\TMGW\COLBURN_.T

[96566] [S805] GEDCOM File C:\TMGW\COLBURN_.T

[96567] [S805] GEDCOM File C:\TMGW\COLBURN_.T

[96568] [S806] GEDCOM File Ed Colburn

[96569] [S805] GEDCOM File C:\TMGW\COLBURN_.T

[96570] [S806] GEDCOM File Ed Colburn

[96571] [S805] GEDCOM File C:\TMGW\COLBURN_.T

[147533] [S806] GEDCOM File Ed Colburn

[147534] [S805] GEDCOM File C:\TMGW\COLBURN_.T

[147535] [S806] GEDCOM File Ed Colburn

[147536] [S805] GEDCOM File C:\TMGW\COLBURN_.T


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Malcolm M. THORPE

6 May 1886 - ____

Family 1 : Mabel E. HOSFORD
  1.  Ruth Ellen THORPE

    __
 __|
|  |__
|
|--Malcolm M. THORPE 
|
|   __
|__|
   |__

INDEX

[70054] [S168] THE HOSFORD GENEALOGY,

[144131] [S168] THE HOSFORD GENEALOGY,


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