More information on the English background of the Family is included in Memoirs of seventy years of an eventful life published by Charles Hulbert in England in 1852. The book is now available at Google Books.
“The family of Hulbert, Hurlbert or Hurlbut, as the name has been variously spelt at different time, are probably of Saxon origin… met with the name frequently in Germany. The principal families now existing, are traceable to Corsham, in Wiltshire…  My paternal ancestors appear to have been Yeoman in the parishes of Bowden and Cheadle for several centuries.”

” the last and present generation agreed to adopt the softer mode of spelling, namely Hulbert, the Cheshire branch had previously preferred the harder spelling Hurlbut..”

The following are excerpts from the book relating to Family Background:

 

Text pg 24

The family of Hulbert, Hurlbert or Hurlbut, as the name has been variously spelt at different time, are probably of Saxon origin: for I was informed by the Reverend J. Pettingall, that he had met with the name frequently in Germany. The principal families now existing, are traceable to Corsham, in Wiltshire. My excellent friend Mr. John Ferguson Hulbert, M.N.C.S, Author of “Wisdom and other Poems,” is of the Corsham family. James Hulbert, a citizen of London, was a great benefactor to the Fishmonger’s Company, London, and his statue adorns the centre of the Alms houses in Southwark. In 1639, Sir John Borough, Garter King at Arms, granted Arms to Justice George Hulbert: viz. Quarterly Argent and Sable, in the sinister chief and dexter bent grasping a halberd proper, - This information was obligingly afforded to me by my late honoured correspondent, Sir William Olimeley, Knt. L.L.S. with a Drawing taken from a Manuscript in the British Museum: observing that he had found the same Arms in a more ancient document, but without a Crest. He had also met with those of Mottershead (mother’s family-GH), which are “Sable, on a chevron argent, between three crosslets, Oz as many quarterfoils guiles. Crest upon a wreath of the colours, a stump of a tree ppr. A brance issuing from the dexter side: and which agree with thoe in Mooles Dictionary of Heraldry, and other works: In which the above variations of the name Hulbert, is also noticed, as denoting the same family.

 

The following is a copy of the inscription on a Monument in the Parish Church of Corsham.

  “JOHN and THOMAS HULBERT of this Towne of Corsham, Clothiers;-the Sons of James Hulbert of Easton, within this Parish, Clothier, deceased, - John the eldest aged 49 happily exchanged this life, the 3rd of September, 1626. Thomas the younger, aged 53, finished his course the 16th of October, 1632. Of whose powerful prayers with God, and most Christian departure, our witness with many others that were then like-wise present,-Sir Edward Hungerford, Knight of the Honorable Order of the Bathe, and Sheriff of this County of Wilts, who hath caused this to be erected in memory of these Brothers, as well for their pious and profitable conversation with all, as for their constant faithful respect to him in particular; and especially to the praiseworthy service that Thomas Hulbert did him in that year 1632 –

Two Brothers neare Interred here do lye

Whose love to each, whose trade was charitye,

Whose seal to God, whose trothe to all was such,

As they seemed one, of all admired much –

John was the eldest, a man discreet and stout,

Faithful and just, In all he went about,

By seniority he first obtained

The blessed Port, which Tomas since has gained,

Thomas was endowed with such rare parts

He no wayes need to be taught the arts,

And though he kept him to his trade in cloth,

Yet was he devise and a courtier both,

A Father strict, yet trader to his childe,

A loving neighbour, and a master milde,

Who never did the deedy poor costenor,

And God enriched him by the hands of them,

Each like to other in their choices parts,

Each Brothers praise, speaks the other his deserts,

Over whose dust, doth this monument remain,

Scarce two such Brothers, hath the world again”

  My paternal ancestors appear to have been Yeoman in the parishes of Bowden and Cheadle for several centuries

 

A very respectable family of Hulbert, have resided in the old Vicarage House, at Bingley, near Bradford, Yorkshire, for about a Century. The Grandfather of the present Mr. John and Mr. James Hulbert, came from Wiltshire; having married a Yorkshire Lady, and settled in Bingley.

 

Pg.27

One of my uncles fell deeply in love with a servant maid, whom he desired to marry; this was sternly forbidden by my lofty Grandmother. Distressed and agonized by the disappointment, he left his country, settled in America, and as I have been informed, became the founder of a race of men, some of whom have filled important situations in the Provincial Government; others have been distinguished Ministers and members of religious communities.

 

Pg.90

(Parish Church of Bowden)

  But to myself and family the most interesting rememberences of Parents and relatives..

Thomas..my honored father died March 5th, 1805, aged 60 years and is buried at Leigh in Lanceshire..That Samuel Hulbert, (my grandfather) died August 27th, 1800, aged 88 years…

 

Some of the nineteen children are known to have emigrated to America, and their descendants are now of some distinction…

 

As previously noticed, until the last and present generation agreed to adopt the softer mode of spelling, namely Hulbert, the Cheshire branch had previously preferred the harder spelling Hurlbut.